How can we remove the entire portion of the prostate that can block urine flow?

Prostate Treatment

One of the most common questions we get asked is how can we remove the entire portion of the prostate that can block urine flow? The simple answer is, we can’t. At least not yet. We can, however, remove a very large portion of the prostate. This will unblock the urine flow in nearly all men. The question then becomes, how much of the prostate can be removed without causing serious side effects?

The prostate and its relationship to urine flow

The prostate produces a fluid that helps to nourish and transport sperm. The urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out through the penis, runs through the centre of the prostate.

As men age, the prostate can begin to grow larger and can start to block urine flow. This can cause urinary symptoms such as hesitancy (difficulty starting urination), decreased urine stream, straining to urinate, and dribbling after urination. If left untreated, this can lead to urinary retention (an inability to empty the bladder) and kidney damage.

Fortunately, there are prostate treatments available that can remove the portion of the prostate that is blocking urine flow. One common treatment is transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). During this procedure, a surgeon inserts a thin telescope-like instrument (resectoscope) through the tip of the penis into the urethra. The obstructing tissue is then removed with special instruments passed through the resectoscope. TURP is usually performed as an outpatient procedure and most men experience significant relief from their urinary symptoms afterwards.

The different ways to treat an enlarged prostate

There are a number of different ways to treat an enlarged prostate, depending on the severity of the condition. In some cases, medication can be used to help reduce the size of the prostate and improve urine flow. If the enlarged prostate is causing more serious problems, such as urinary retention or kidney damage, surgery may be necessary to remove part or all of the prostate.

1. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP): This is a surgery to remove the part of the prostate that is blocking urine flow. A tube called a resectoscope is inserted through the penis into the prostate. The surgeon uses this to cut away the tissue that is blocking urine flow.

2. Open surgical prostatectomy: This is a surgery to remove the entire prostate gland. 

3. Transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT): This treatment uses heat to destroy the tissue that is blocking urine flow. A probe is inserted through the penis into the prostate. microwave energy is sent through the probe to heat up and destroy the tissue.

4. Transurethral needle ablation (TUNA): This treatment also uses heat to destroy tissue, but it uses radiofrequency waves instead of microwaves. A probe is inserted through the penis into the prostate and radiofrequency waves are sent through the probe to heat up and destroy tissue.

5. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU): This treatment uses sound waves to destroy tissue that is blocking urine flow. A probe is inserted into the rectum, next to the prostate. The sound waves go through the probe and create a high-intensity focus point that destroys tissue it comes into contact with without harming nearby tissues

Pros and cons of each method:

There are two main types of prostate surgery: open surgery and laparoscopic surgery. Both have their pros and cons.

Open surgery is the more traditional approach. It involves making a large incision in the lower abdomen in order to access the prostate. The surgeon then removes the entire prostate gland and surrounding tissue. Open surgery has a higher risk of complications, such as infection and bleeding, but it generally has a lower risk of erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence.

Laparoscopic surgery is less invasive than open surgery. It involves making several small incisions in the abdomen and inserting special instruments into the body. The surgeon then removes the prostate gland through these incisions. Laparoscopic surgery has a lower risk of complications but a higher risk of erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence.

There are two main types of prostate surgery: transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open prostatectomy.

TURP is the most common type of prostate surgery. It involves removing part of the prostate through a tube inserted into the penis. TURP is usually done under general anaesthesia and takes 1-2 hours. Recovery time is usually shorter with TURP, and you can usually go home the same day or the next day.

Open prostatectomy is less common than TURP. It involves making an incision in your lower abdomen and removing the entire prostate gland. Open prostatectomy is usually done under general anaesthesia and takes 2-4 hours. Recovery time is longer with open prostatectomy, and you will likely stay in the hospital for 3-5 days.

Both TURP and open prostatectomy have potential risks and complications, including: bleeding, infection, urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, and urinary retention. Your doctor will discuss these risks with you before your surgery so that you can make an informed decision about which procedure is right for you.

New breakthrough treatment for an enlarged prostate:

A new breakthrough treatment for an enlarged prostate is available that can remove the entire portion of the prostate that can block urine flow. This new treatment, called prostatic urethral lift (PUL), is minimally invasive and does not require any removal of the prostate. PUL is a safe and effective alternative to traditional treatments for an enlarged prostate, such as transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open surgery.

PUL involves placing a small device on the prostate that lifts the urethra and relieves pressure on the urinary tract.  PUL is typically performed in conjunction with another minimally invasive procedure, such as transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT), to shrink the size of the prostate.

The advantages of PULL over traditional treatments for an enlarged prostate include a shorter hospital stay, less risk of bleeding and infection, and a quicker return to normal activities. In addition, PUL preserves sexual function and improves quality of life.

There has been a recent breakthrough in the treatment of an enlarged prostate. It is now possible to remove the entire portion of the prostate that can block urine flow. This is a major advance in the treatment of this condition.

It produces semen and helps to transport it during ejaculation. The prostate also helps to control urination. When the prostate becomes enlarged, it can compress the urethra and block urine flow. This can cause difficulty urinating, dribbling, and a feeling of incomplete bladder emptying.

The new treatment involves removing the entire prostate gland through a small incision in the abdomen. It is highly effective at relieving symptoms and restoring urinary function. In most cases, it can be performed laparoscopically, which means that there are no large incisions or stitches required.

If you are suffering from an enlarged prostate, talk to your doctor about this new treatment option. It may be able to help you regain control over your urinary function and improve your quality of life.

Conclusion:

We can remove the entire portion of the prostate that can block urine flow by doing a surgery called transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). This is a minimally invasive surgery that can be done on an outpatient basis, meaning you won’t have to stay in the hospital overnight. The surgeon will make a small incision in your penis and then insert a tube with a camera on the end into your urinary tract. They will then use special instruments to remove the obstructing tissue from your prostate.

FAQ’s:

1. Is it possible to cut the prostate in half?

Nowadays, open procedures are rarely used. In comparison to a radical prostatectomy, a simple prostatectomy does not always require the removal of the entire prostate.

2. How can your prostate be entirely drained?

Your prostate tubes are cleared of that fluid when you massage your prostate. Your doctor will perform the treatment by inserting a gloved finger into your rectum and massaging or pressing on your prostate from there. Although it could be a little unpleasant, it doesn’t take very long.

3. What happens if you get your prostate partially removed?

The two main potential side effects of radical prostatectomy are erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence (impotence; problems getting or keeping erections). The other types of prostate cancer are likewise susceptible to these negative effects.

4. After removal, may a prostate come back?

It is well known that the prostate grows back following surgery, and one in ten men require another TURP within ten years. A follow-up trial to compare how quickly the prostate grows back in men who underwent either TURP or ThuVARP surgery is being sought after by researchers in an effort to secure funding.

5. Is a normal life possible after prostate removal?

It may take some time to acclimate to life following prostate cancer therapy. Some men may not feel the emotional effects of what they have gone through until they have completed treatment. Others’ immediate priority is dealing with the negative physical effects.

Er. Dhirendra (Author)

Er. Dhirendra (Author)

An author of KnowFromBlog, We have published more articles focused on blogging, business, lifestyle, digital marketing, social media, web design & development, e-commerce, finance, health, SEO, travel. For any types of queries, contact us on knowfromblog@gmail.com

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